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Freezable Oregano Pesto: Dairy Free, Gluten Free, Vegan

1:28 PM


Hey, we missed you yesterday. Sorry about that—sometimes Mondays are just crazy. Know that feeling? If your kiddo went back to school yesterday, congrats. You made it! We hope you made them some brownies and sent them skipping on their merry way. And if you don't have kids, congrats! We don't either (which means more brownies for us).

Today we're going to talk about something so yummy, so incredibly amazingly delicious, that it's practically the savory version of brownies. Everybody loves it. You pretty much can't go wrong. Yep, today we're talking pesto.


Pesto is an Italian sauce usually made from garlic, basil, European pine nuts, olive oil, Parmigiano Reggiano and a sheep milk cheese called Fiore Sardo. The word itself is a generic term for anything made by pounding, though, so a lot of other varieties exist. We happen to have an incredibly enormous oregano plant growing in our backyard so we decided on oregano pesto instead of the traditional, and we omitted the cheese (instead of substituting it) to give us more flexibility of palette when using the stuff. 

The best thing about this recipe is that it freezes well. You don't have to freeze it, of course, but this makes a decent amount and it only lasts in the fridge for about a week.


Prep Time: 10 minutes

Ingredients:

2 cups fresh oregano leaves
2 cloves of garlic
2 handfuls of baby arugula 
2 tbsp pine nuts
pinch of salt
1/2 cup olive oil, approximately

1. Clean Your Greens
Rinse and dry your oregano and arugula. 

2. Blend Everything
Using your food processor or VitaMix, pulse together your oregano, garlic, arugula, pine nuts and salt. Slowly drizzle in your olive oil until it makes a sauce. You can have it as thin or as thick as you'd like—just slowly add oil until you reach your desired consistency. 

3. Freeze
Spray a clean ice cube tray with nonstick oil and spoon in your pesto. Ours made about eight cubes. Drizzle a thin layer of olive oil over the top to prevent it from oxidizing. Cover the tray with plastic wrap, pressing it down on each cube to keep as much air out as possible. You'll want to freeze them overnight, then transfer them to a plastic bag so that you can have your ice cube tray back! They'll keep for six months to one year. 

Whenever you need pesto you'll be able to grab it straight from the freezer! We use about two cubes for 3-4 servings of pasta—come back tomorrow for our awesome fettuccini pesto alfredo recipe. 


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